Analog, September 2008

Henry G. Stratmann. The Last Tempation of Katerina Savitskaya. A sequel to ‘The Paradise Project’ (Analog Nov 2007) which I noted was ‘very much Golden Age SF in its telling and characterisation … some charmingly old-fashioned morals’. And sure enough we are re-introduced to Katerina standing with her freshly shampooed hair blowing in the breeze,… Continue reading Analog, September 2008

Analog, April 2008

Thomas R. Dulsi. Guaranteed Not to Turn Pink in the Can. A private investigator is hired by a concerned father to check up on his daughter – an academic who has suddenly eschewed her scientific background for best-seller popular science. The PI is intrigued, as her first book, about alien abduction, is clearly an academic… Continue reading Analog, April 2008

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, January/February 2007

Rajnar Vajra. Emerald River, Pearl Sky. The story starts with unidentified observers from a thousand years beyond the narrative which unfolds, who introduce one Vincas Magus, a wizened elderly man walking on twisted legs along a path flanked by apple blossom. When Vincas is confronted by a too steep bridge over a river we find… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, January/February 2007

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, April 2006

Reviewed : MobiPocket version on a Tapwave Zodiac. Wil McCarthy. Boundary Condition. National Weather Service astronauts have a surprise visit – from Pope Dave : cue the joke about the Pope driving his car instead of his chauffer, and some other creaky dialog. The story gives some ponderation to the role ‘God’ may have in… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, April 2006

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, October 2005

eBookman version reviewed Amy Bechtel. Language Lessons. It’s some sixteen years since the cutesy creatures featured in this story first appeared (‘Little Monsters’ Analog, Nov 1989). Seven stories on and it’s getting just a little thin IMHO. I read the last one, notable for one of the worst covers in recent Analog history (if you… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, October 2005

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, January/February 2004

Both Analog and Asimov’s announced during 2003 that they would be publishing one issue less per year : moving to two double-month issues, and eight single-month issues. This is the first of the two double-month issues of the year, to complement the July/August double issue. Ramona Louise Wheeler. Inherit the Vortex. Further adventures of Ray… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, January/February 2004

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, February 2003

Rajna Vajra. Shootout at the Nokai Corral. A four-part serialisation. Stephen L. Burns. Capture Radius. A young woman in her father’s space-vessel in Earth orbit is clearing up space-junk, a potentially lucrative business. However, when the Russian mafia hijack a nearby vessel, she has to play for higher stakes. I would recommend Burns touts the… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, February 2003

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, December 2002

Michael Swanwick. Slow Life. Standard Analog fayre from an author whom you wouldn’t immediately associate with Analog. Lizzie O’Brien is part of an expedition on Titan, hamstrung slightly by media fascination and online chats with members of the public back home. Whilst a turbot-cam (and, yes, that is right – a turbot-cam as opposed to… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, December 2002

Analog Science Fiction and Fact, May 2002

Dave Creek. Splendor’s Truth. A third ‘Splendor’ story, following two published in Analog during 2000, neither of which I have read. Earth Unity Ambassador Chanda Kasmira faces a tricky situation when she is re-united with Sobrerian commander Domerlan, with whom she has had a run-in before. This time the belligerant Domerlan, whose race are sufficiently… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Fact, May 2002

Analog Science Fiction and Fact, October 2001 (Peanut Press edition)

Pele. Poul Anderson. Pele is arguably the greatest footballer (US: soccer player) who ever lived, the Brazilian whose international career spanned three decades and several World Cups. He also had the signal honour of a poster of him hanging on my bedroom wall in the early 1970s. That poster was replaced in 1978 by a… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Fact, October 2001 (Peanut Press edition)