Asimovs, February 2008

Michael Swanwick. From Babel’s Fall’n Glory We Fled… The opening paragraph is a doozy – it describes the titular city on Europa, and does so quite beautifully across several sentences, and then kicks into a higher gear as the narrator describes herself : a simulation of one of the humans killed in the destruction of… Continue reading Asimovs, February 2008

Analog, January/February 2009

Rajna Vajra. Doctor Alien. A story from an Analog regular very much in the usual Analog vein – not a challenging read in terms of writing style, unless of course you are awkward sod who finds an easy to read writing style difficult to read. I fall into that camp – I managed just one… Continue reading Analog, January/February 2009

Analog, May 2008

David Bartell. Test Signals. A multi-limbed geek involved in computers is rapidly involving in something or other – sorry, this was just way too clunky to persevere with. Dave Creek. No Traveller Returns. Further adventures of Mike Christopher. Eric James Stone. The Ashes of His Fathers. Looks at the price someone is willing to pay… Continue reading Analog, May 2008

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, September 2006

Richard A. Lovett. A Pound of Flesh. The title refers to Shakespeare’s Shylock, who lent money on the basis that could extract said charge when the loan was defaulted upon. Whilst Lovett updates this principal to a nano-tech equivalent, his protagonist uses some archaic language – how long is it since some has exclaimed “Gad!”,… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, September 2006

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, July/August 2006

Reviewed : MobiPocket version on a Tapwave Zodiac. Alexis Glynn Latner. Witherspin. A somewhat contrived adventure in which an enhanced male, with a criminal record, and his female companion have to escape the clutches of various cod-fantasy types after them (trolls, crusaders, sabre toothed tigers), in an orbiting habitat which features several different climatic zones.… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, July/August 2006

Analog, June 2006.

Reviewed : MobiPocket version on a Tapwave Zodiac. James Grayson and Kathy Ferguson. Puncher’s Chance. Dave, a mature space engineer/pilot is nonplussed when a politician who is opposed to the spage program comes on an inspection of an earth-orbiting station, en route to Mars. He gets the job of taking her, on a shuttle somewhat… Continue reading Analog, June 2006.

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, May 2006

Reviewed : MobiPocket version on a Tapwave Zodiac. Edward M. Lerner. A New Order of Things Part I of IV. First part of an installment set in the author’s milieu featuring radio communication with other intelligence species across the universe. Rob Chilson. Farmers In the Sky. Fairly routine story, closer to juvenile SF when compared… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, May 2006

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, December 2003

P.J. Plauger. Lucky Luke. Lucky is almost 21, and thus about to come into the inheritance left for him in his scientist father’s will (he was orphaned at five). That’s the good news. The bad news : his guardian, the owner of a private college, is not at all keen on this happening, and is… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, December 2003

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, November 2003

Larry Niven and Brenda Cooper. The Trellis. Pluto and Charon are conjoined through genetically modified creepers, which carry water from Charon to Pluto, and also enable the scientists at the research facilities at each base of the creeper to travel between the ‘planets’. It is Lark’s sixteenth birthday, and she is headed down/up the creeper,… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, November 2003

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, October 2003

Vernor Vinge. The Cookie Monster. Dixie Mae is pleased with her new job with a hi-tech company. However, a strange e-mail jolts her out of this situation. Something very strange is going on. Very strange. Dixie Mae and her colleagues set out to solve the mystery. It transpires that Dixie Mae is in fact an… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, October 2003

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, September 2003

Edward M. Lerner. Moonstruck. Part One of Four. A serialized novel. Lerner’s ‘Dangling Conversations’ stories had First Contact being made by radio transmission, with trading in knowledge between species being the only contact. Here he has a more traditional First contact, with aliens arriving on Earth. I won’t be reading the story and thus won’t… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, September 2003

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, June 2003

Lloyd Biggle, Jr. Of the Zornler, By the Zornler. Another tale in the ‘Interplanetary Relations Bureau’, stories in which planets of varying degrees of alienness have the benefit of intervention by said agency. On the planet Zornley, a dead-ringer for medieval Europe, a relatively inexperienced operative of the Bureau decides to experiment with imposing demoncracy… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, June 2003

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, October 2002

Edward M. Lerner. Survival Instinct. The first lengthy instalment of a novel serialisation which continues on from the events of ‘Presence of Mind’ (Analog, February 2002). Having been reading short stories almost exclusively for several years making my way through this proved no easy task. Having several characters introduced with personal background information in the… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, October 2002

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, July/August 2002

Adam Troy Castro. Unseen Demons. A touch of the ‘Lecters’ in that a young woman, with some dark secrets in her own past, has to confront a ‘monster’ in the shape of an Earth diplomat. Emil Sandburg, an otherwise dull and simple man, has been slaughtering specimens of the indigineous life form. There is a… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, July/August 2002

Analog Science Fiction and Fact, February 2002

The issue starts with Part II of IV of Robert J. Sawyer’s novel ‘Hominids’. Presence of Mind. Edward M. Lerner. The story follows a short ‘biolog’ of one Edward J. Lerner – not the first name the middle initial has been problematic in electronic format for this author! Lerner provides a near-future techno-thriller in which… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Fact, February 2002

Analog Science Fiction and Fact, May 2001 (Peanut Press edition)

The Precipice. Ben Bova. This is the first part of a novel serialisation. As I don’t read novel serialisations, let us press on… My Favorite Robot. Ron Goulart. Goulart’s ‘My Pal Clunky’ appeared in Analog a couple of years ago, and was collected by Hartwell in Years Best SF 4, which is where I read… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Fact, May 2001 (Peanut Press edition)

Analog Science Fiction and Fact, March 2001 (Peanut Press edition)

Magic’s Price. Bud Sparhawk. Jacob lives on his family’s farm. Unlike most, he is fascinated by the strange machines that lie inertly around the countryside. When magicians arrive in the village, one of whom is a strikingly attractive young woman, he takes the chance to learn from them. The magicians are in fact engineers who… Continue reading Analog Science Fiction and Fact, March 2001 (Peanut Press edition)

Year’s Best SF 7. David G. Hartwell. Eos Books 2002

Stories by : Alastair Reynolds, Brian W. Aldiss, David Morrell, Edward M. Lerner, Gene Wolfe., Gregory Benford, James Morrow, James Patrick Kelly, Lisa Goldstein, Michael Swanwick, Nancy Kress, Richard Chwedyk, Simon Ings, Stephen Baxter, Terry Bisson, Terry Dowling, Thomas M. Disch, Ursula K. Le Guin.