Tag Archives | Jack Williamson

Fantasy and Science Fiction February 2002

The Man on the Persian Carpet. Kate Wilhem. A potent blend of mystery/suspense, time travel and a sacrifice needed to keep the world in balance. The writing oozes class, as one would expect. Afterlife. Jack Williamson. I was a bit unmoved by Williamson’s Hugo-winning “The Ultimate Earth”, but enjoyed this shorter story hugely. Whilst “The […]

Asimovs, October/November 2003

Walter Jon Williams. The Green Leopard Plague. A very skilfully crafted short story. Set in the same future as his well-received ‘Lethe’, this is of an equally high standard. Williams intertwines two, or in fact three stories, tying them together in a powerful ending. We start in the warm waters of the Philippine sea – […]

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, April 2005

Jack Williamson. The Stonehenge Gate. Third and final instalment of a novel serialisation. Kyle Kirkland. Company Secrets. Merv Dunn, Inc, is an infomeister in a particularly unappealing near future, in which those in the private sector are fully incorporated, and look down on the ‘sheep’ who work for a living – particularly those working for […]

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, March 2005

Jack Williamson. The Stonehenge Gate. Second instalment of a novel serialisation. Shane Tourtellotte. Acts of Conscience. In ‘A New Man’ (Oct 2003), to which this is a followup, Tourtellotte explored issues of rehabilitation of criminals through the use of mind wipes/overlays. Here he looks at other ethical issues with the technique, as Dr Lucinda Carr […]

Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact, January/February 2005

Jack Williamson. The Stonehenge Gate. First instalment of a novel serialisation. Michael A. Burstein. 75 Years. A historian visits and berates her politician ex-husband for attempting to push back the period before individual census forms are made available, from 72 to 75 years. She knows the guilty secret which he is hiding, which is the […]

Analog Science Fiction and Fact, January 2001 (Peanut Press edition)

Editorial Stanley Schmidt’s editorial ponders the ‘danger’ inherent in politics when the ideologies of political parties come together. He remembers John W. Campbell’s support for the Presidential Campaign of Governor Wallace in the Sixties on the basis that he was the only candidate with ‘significantly different’ ideas. Call me a lily-livered liberal, but give me […]