Best Science Fiction of the Year 16. ed Terry Carr. 1987


Story summaries written sometime between 1990 and 1999.

Kim Stanley Robinson. Escape from Kathmandu.
Originally in : Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, September 1986.

A ‘madcap Himalayan farce’ involving a yeti and President Jimmy Carter.

Orson Scott Card. Hatrack River.
Originally in : Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, August 1986

Rural 19th century America, with homesteaders helped by Little Peggy’s second sight.

Robert Silverberg. Blindsight.
Originally in : Playboy, December 1986.

Valparaiso, an orbiting ‘safe-house’, inhabited by criminals or others with secrets to hide. One visitor, without eyes, but far from blind, is seeking the person responsible for making him that way.

Carter Scholz. Galileo Complains.
Originally in : Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, June 1986

Galileo resurrected.

Lucius Shepard. Aymara.
Originally in : Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, August 1986

Experimentation in time travel to alter the course of history has enormous impact on the present and the future – on a global level, and for the protagonist and his love for Aymara.

Ian Watson. Cold Light.
Originally in : Fantasy & Science Fiction, April 1986.

John Ingolby, prominent churchman, develops what at first appears to be a halo.

Judith Moffett. Surviving.
Originally in : Fantasy & Science Fiction, June 1986.

A re-working of the Tarzan story, from the female (and lesbian) perspective.

James Patrick Kelly. The Prisoner of Chillon.
Originally in : Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction, June 1986

High tech data heist leads to the Prison of Chillon, and the eponymous prisoner, imprisoned by his disabilities and more.

Harry Turtledove. And so to bed.
Originally in : Analog, January 1986

The diaries of Samual Pepys viz. finding the Missing Link in the Americas, and the slavery of those thereof.

Richard Kearns. Grave Angels.
Originally in : Fantasy & Science Fiction, April 1986.

Mr. Beauchamps has been a grave-digger for a long, long time. So long that a replacement must surely need to be found.

John Varley. Tango Charlie and Foxtrot Romeo.
Originally in : Blue Champagne, 1986.

Anna Louise Bach, Lunar Spacewoman (and evidently heroine of other stories) plays a key role in rescuing a long-lost girl (and her dogs) from an orbiting research station.

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